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Scott Elliot Surprises at Ben Avery Shoot

scottelliote72Arizona rifleman uses a stock Winchester Low Wall to compete against high dollar custom guns.

When it come to smallbore rifle shooting, the hardware used in competition often looks like something right out of Buck Roger, and usually comes with a big bucks price tag to match. But in the case of Scott Elliot of Scottsdale, Arizona, combining shooting skill, some good ammo and a Model 1885 Low Wall from Winchester Repeating Arms has produced credible results.

The Model 1885 was originally invented by the legendary gun designer John M. Browning…

First, a bit of background is in order. The Model 1885 was originally invented by the legendary gun designer John M. Browning, for which he was granted a U.S. patent way back in 1878. It was the first of what would eventually number more than one hundred patents awarded to Mr. Browning.

Several years later Winchester Repeating Arms representatives met with Mr. Browning and purchased the rights to manufacture his design under the Winchester banner, calling it the Model 1885 Single Shot. This transaction was the beginning of a two-decade long design relationship between Mr. Browning and Winchester Repeating Arms that resulted in many of the most famous and iconic guns in American history.

The Model 1885 single shot has probably been chambered for more cartridges than any other firearm in history.

The Model 1885 single shot has probably been chambered for more cartridges than any other firearm in history. The High Wall version was designed the handle the large, powerful “buffalo” cartridges of the period like the 45-70 Government, while the smaller, more graceful Low Wall was intended for lighter, less powerful centerfire and rimfire cartridges. In fact, the Low Wall Rimfire is still in the product line at Winchester Repeating Arms.

“It looks very elegant, attractive and possesses classic lines.”

And that fact brings us to a recent letter from Mr. Elliot. “In December of 2014 I purchased a Winchester Low Wall chambered in 22 Long Rifle,” writes Elliot. “I mounted (it with) a Leupold VX-II 3-9×33 EFR Rimfire scope. My first impression was that this combination would make a good handling little package. It looks very elegant, attractive and possesses classic lines. The fit and finish is impeccable, just very well done. The bluing is polished to a rich deep blue and the wood is not over the top gaudy. The stock is just a real nice piece of walnut with an oil finish. The operation of the rifle is smooth with a clean trigger pull.”

“I am pleased to report that my expectations have been greatly surpassed.

Of course the real proof is in the pudding, or on paper in this case. “In regards to accuracy I expected the rifle to shoot .75 inch groups at 50 yards with match grade ammunition,” Elliot continued. “I am pleased to report that my expectations have been greatly surpassed. At 50 yards, with match grade ammunition this little rifle has produced 5 shot groups measuring in the .3 inch range and .7 inch range at 100 yards!” (For those of you who are mathematically and historically inclined, that’s five shots into less than ¾ minutes of angle at a full 100 yards with 22 LR ammo fired from a gun originally designed not long after the end of the Civil War.)

“In February of  2015 I began to shoot with my local Schuetzen group at the Ben Avery Range in Phoenix, Arizona,” reported Elliot. “We are affiliated with the American Single Shot Rifle Association (www.assra.com). We conduct monthly matches and recently held a South West Regional match where shooters from Arizona, California, Colorado, Nebraska and Washington shot with each other. I am pleased to report that with an off-the shelf-rifle I was able to compete and be competitive at a respectable level. In fact I actually finished 5th place in the benchrest event.”

“…A quality single shot rifle which represents an exceptional value.”

“I do not hesitate to recommend this rifle to a shooter that wishes to own a quality single shot rifle which represents an exceptional value,” concluded Elliot.

If you’d like to see the rifle Mr. Elliot is shooting, visit winchesterguns.com or just drop by your local Winchester Repeating Arms dealer and ask to see a Model 1885 Low Wall Hunter. They are currently available in 22 LR, 22 WMR, 17 HMR and 17 WSM.

rizona rifleman uses a stock Winchester Low Wall to compete against high dollar custom guns.

When it come to smallbore rifle shooting, the hardware used in competition often looks like something right out of Buck Roger, and usually comes with a big bucks price tag to match. But in the case of Scott Elliot of Scottsdale, Arizona, combining shooting skill, some good ammo and a Model 1885 Low Wall from Winchester Repeating Arms has produced credible results.

The Model 1885 was originally invented by the legendary gun designer John M. Browning…

First, a bit of background is in order. The Model 1885 was originally invented by the legendary gun designer John M. Browning, for which he was granted a U.S. patent way back in 1878. It was the first of what would eventually number more than one hundred patents awarded to Mr. Browning.

Several years later Winchester Repeating Arms representatives met with Mr. Browning and purchased the rights to manufacture his design under the Winchester banner, calling it the Model 1885 Single Shot. This transaction was the beginning of a two-decade long design relationship between Mr. Browning and Winchester Repeating Arms that resulted in many of the most famous and iconic guns in American history.

The Model 1885 single shot has probably been chambered for more cartridges than any other firearm in history.

The Model 1885 single shot has probably been chambered for more cartridges than any other firearm in history. The High Wall version was designed the handle the large, powerful “buffalo” cartridges of the period like the 45-70 Government, while the smaller, more graceful Low Wall was intended for lighter, less powerful centerfire and rimfire cartridges. In fact, the Low Wall Rimfire is still in the product line at Winchester Repeating Arms.

“It looks very elegant, attractive and possesses classic lines.”

And that fact brings us to a recent letter from Mr. Elliot. “In December of 2014 I purchased a Winchester Low Wall chambered in 22 Long Rifle,” writes Elliot. “I mounted (it with) a Leupold VX-II 3-9×33 EFR Rimfire scope. My first impression was that this combination would make a good handling little package. It looks very elegant, attractive and possesses classic lines. The fit and finish is impeccable, just very well done. The bluing is polished to a rich deep blue and the wood is not over the top gaudy. The stock is just a real nice piece of walnut with an oil finish. The operation of the rifle is smooth with a clean trigger pull.”

“I am pleased to report that my expectations have been greatly surpassed.

Of course the real proof is in the pudding, or on paper in this case. “In regards to accuracy I expected the rifle to shoot .75 inch groups at 50 yards with match grade ammunition,” Elliot continued. “I am pleased to report that my expectations have been greatly surpassed. At 50 yards, with match grade ammunition this little rifle has produced 5 shot groups measuring in the .3 inch range and .7 inch range at 100 yards!” (For those of you who are mathematically and historically inclined, that’s five shots into less than ¾ minutes of angle at a full 100 yards with 22 LR ammo fired from a gun originally designed not long after the end of the Civil War.)

“In February of  2015 I began to shoot with my local Schuetzen group at the Ben Avery Range in Phoenix, Arizona,” reported Elliot. “We are affiliated with the American Single Shot Rifle Association (www.assra.com). We conduct monthly matches and recently held a South West Regional match where shooters from Arizona, California, Colorado, Nebraska and Washington shot with each other. I am pleased to report that with an off-the shelf-rifle I was able to compete and be competitive at a respectable level. In fact I actually finished 5th place in the benchrest event.”

“…A quality single shot rifle which represents an exceptional value.”

“I do not hesitate to recommend this rifle to a shooter that wishes to own a quality single shot rifle which represents an exceptional value,” concluded Elliot.

If you’d like to see the rifle Mr. Elliot is shooting, visit winchesterguns.com or just drop by your local Winchester Repeating Arms dealer and ask to see a Model 1885 Low Wall Hunter. They are currently available in 22 LR, 22 WMR, 17 HMR and 17 WSM.