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A Test Rifle is Born

At the request of our owner, Western Powders’ head ballistician, Keith Anderson, set about building a rifle for extended-range outdoor testing.  The process began with a blue printed Remington Model 700 action and a 1 in 8″ twist 6.5 caliber Bartlein barrel.  Once the rifle was headspaced, it came back into the shop for fitting into a McMillan stock.  We followed the rifles development from that point on.

Head ballistician, Keith Anderson, inlets the McMillan stock to make room for bedding compound.

Because of the heavy barrel contour, weights were added to the stock’s butt and then secured with spray foam insulation. This will help the rifle ride the bags better under recoil.

A Pachmayr recoil pad was then fitted to the stock.

Ballistician Mike Murphy poses with the bedding compound, Marine-Tex.

Small amounts of excess bedding material were easily cleared once the action was removed from the stock.

Tape was used to set the barrel’s free float and center it in the stock.

Once hardened, the action was removed from the stock to allow for bedding clean-up.

The rear take-down screw hole was enlarged and filled with bedding compound to make a durable pillar.

Reliefs were cut into the bedding compound to provide clearance for the action screws.

The 20 MOA picatinny rail was bedded to match the receiver contours.

A thin grey line of bedding is visible at the bottom of the rail.

The rail was then reattached to the receiver.

With the bedding complete, the trigger was placed back onto the action. This assembly will eventually be replaced by a Jewell 2 ounce competition trigger.

The 30mm TPS rings were then lapped.

 

And the action was returned to the stock.

 

The barrel was cleaned and the rifle was ready for break-in.

A 6.5 Creedmoor is ready for testing. After breaking in the barrel, the rifle is ready for accuracy testing. We’ll have those results once it stops raining and blowing in Eastern Montana, hopefully next week.